Digestion5

Digestion: You & Your Microbiome Eats

You eat to feed your microbiome,  which in turn, feeds you, or not.
YOU CAN BE WELL FED… BUT MALNOURISHED!

You are NOT what you eat which is contrary to what we hear time and again.

  • Rather, you are what you feed your microbiome.  
  • You are what you digest.
  • You are what you absorb. 

We will discuss lots of practical digestion strategies beginning at the brain and ending at… yep, the commode.

Arguably, poor digestion is the leading cause of disease in the US.   A dsyfunctional gut:
  1. Impairs absorption of vitamins and minerals,
  2. Increases the risk of infections in the gut as well as systemically since immunity is reduced (80 to 85% of our immunity is in the gut),
  3. Increases the risk of abnormal bacterial overgrowth as well as yeast overgrowth in the gut since a pathogenic microbiota can flourish at the expense of beneficial microbiota,
  4. Down regulates our immune system since the gut is unable to perform it’s role of digestion of vitamins and minerals, manufacture of vitamins and antibiotics, and maintenance  of a homeostasis balanced microbiome ecosystem,
  5. Conditions that can result from poor digestion include:
    • SIBO
    • FODMAPS intolerance
    • Fructose malabsorption
    • IBS
    • Gluten sensitivity
    • Other food sensitivities
    • Increased intestinal permeability 
    • Autoimmunity
    • Systemic inflammation:  In addition to gliaden crossing the gut wall, LPS (end-products of certain microbiota strains) crosses the gut wall).  LPS can then cross the blood/brain barrier and impact brain health.  LPS is in fact used in research to induce inflammation in animals as noted in this Medical News Today article, “Newly created turmeric-based formulation releases anti-inflammatory power throughout body “: The researchers injected mice with lipopolysaccharide, a bacteria cell wall extract that stimulates an immune reaction in animals. Curcumin can target many molecules, but the research team zeroed in on NF-kB, a protein that is known to play an important role in the immune response.”  
  6. An antibiotic impacted gut can decrease microbiome  diversity  which is associated with reduced immune system functioning.

To begin, understand enzymes and deficiencies which are a root cause of microbiome disruption having disease consequences by reading the post: “Digestive Enzymes & Disease w/Focus On Autism”.

And for more on microbiome impact from eating nutrient dense, anti-inflammatory whole foods, check out:

“Some of My Best Friends Are Germs”, NY Times article, Michael Pollan, May 2013.

In good health through awareness,

Signature2

One thought on “Digestion: You & Your Microbiome Eats”

Now I'd like to hear your thoughts... comments are always welcome!